The Plastic Brain

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Gotta catch ‘em all!

jtotheizzoe:

lexywagner:

I was packing and I found this t-shirt that my beau got me for my birthday last year. It is the greatest t-shirt in existence.

On the Origin of Pokémon …

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I heart diatoms.

Via infinity-imagined:

Diatoms are single celled photosynthetic algae that are abundant in Earth’s lakes and oceans.  These organisms create intricate nano-scale glass exoskeletons that protect their cellular interiors and focus specific wavelengths of light into photosynthetic protein complexes.  Clusters of silica tubes on the surface form pores that are used to gather nutrients from the environment.  The mechanism by which diatoms construct such beautiful symmetrical shells remains a mystery.

Image Credit: James Tyrwhitt-Drake, University of Victoria.

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Erasmus Darwin’s Zoonomia doesn’t get the popular recognition it deserves. Maybe this won’t bring it to the big time, but at least it’s a step in the right direction.

Via jtotheizzoe:

myampgoesto11:

Typographical scientific artwork by Dr Stephen Gaeta

  1. Extraocular: Text from Zoonomia, the 1794 masterpiece of Erasmus Darwin (grandfather of Charles), in which he attempted to catalog and explain human anatomy, pathology, and physiology, including the visual system. (SOURCE)
  2. Beat Poetry: Text from the seminal 1809 work of cardiologyCases of the Organic Disease of the Heart, with Dissections and Some Remarks Intended to Point Out the Distinctive Symptoms of These Diseases, by John Collins Warren. In this work, Warren describes the symptoms of 11 of his patients with heart disease as they presented in his office and, later, on his dissecting table. (SOURCE)
  3. Reactant: Text from the The Sceptical Chymist by Robert Boyle (1661), in which he provided the foundations of modern chemistry by proving that matter is comprised of individual atoms. (SOURCE)
  4. Transgenic:  Text from Chromosome 1 of the human genome.

[found by Atavus]

I love these more than you love these. I’ll bet you money.

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The Amazing Spider-Math Equation

Just so you know, most directors consult some sort of actual scientists to get the details of their superhero movies right. The Amazing Spider-Man went a step further, to design an equation for a chalkboard scene that would describe how cell regeneration and mortality would work.

Because if you don’t get the scientific details right, Neil deGrasse Tyson will find you, ridicule you, and make you change your movie.

Via jtotheizzoe

( Boing Boing)

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And They’re OFF!

As part of the World Cell Race at the American Society for Cell Biology meeting last week, teams from around the world raced cells in a petri dish to claim the title of “fastest cells in the world”.

I’m sure there’s some wonderful insights into cell motility here, but you probably just want to know who won … it was a bone marrow cell from Singapore, and it clocked in at 0.000000312 kilometers per hour.

Sperm cells were obviously disqualified.

(via Nature)

Via jtotheizzoe

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Largest single-celled organisms found 6 miles under the sea

Researchers have found new examples of the strange singled-celled creatures called xenophyophores more than six miles beneath the surface of the Pacific in the Mariana Trench. At more than four inches in length, they are perhaps the largest single-celled organism on Earth. These protists make a living by sifting through sediments and can accumulate high levels of toxic metals like uranium, lead, and mercury.

Go protists!

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My final column for On Dit. It’s been a blast writing for the uni paper, and I will now have to find new ways to flatter my illustratin’ ego.

[Click through for a zoomable version]

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Now that’s what I called I nice bit of biotechnology.

Click-through for the full story.

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Why don’t whales get the bends?

jtotheizzoe:

skepttv:

Naked Science Scrapbook – Why don’t whales get the bends, when divers can?

If a diver surfaces too quickly after a dive, they can get the bends, or decompression sickness, causing excruciating pain and sometimes even death. In this Naked Science Scrapbook, find out what causes the bends, why human divers can get it and why (usually) whales don’t …

“Questions I have never asked but now must know the answer to”