The Plastic Brain


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Murder on Detroit Avenue: STEMxCON13

I will presenting at the STEMxCON on Saturday morning in Adelaide. However, since it goes out to a global audience, I am hoping that some participants will be checking in on Friday afternoon from the US.

So, what is STEMxCON? From their website:

Welcome to the Global 2013 STEMx Education Conference, the world’s first massively open online conference for educators focusing on Science, Technology, Engineering, Math, and more. The conference is being held over the course of three days, September 19-21, 2013, and is free to attend!

STEMxCon is a highly inclusive event designed to engage students and educators around the globe and we encourage primary, secondary, and tertiary (K-16) educators around the world to share and learn about innovative approaches to STEMx learning and teaching.

You can view the schedule in your own timezone here. Check it out, there are some amazing talks that will be happening 24hrs a day.

Case cover

My own talk is titled: 

Murder on Detroit Avenue: An interdisciplinary STEM Unit

…and a link to the full description is here.

As a courtesy to STEMxCON participants and readers of this blog, the Case Notes which I wrote for my murder investigation role-play can be downloaded here: Case file. The slides from the talk are here: STEMxCON Final

I am looking forward to presenting, as well as attending as many of the talks I can. Some to look out for are from my colleagues at the the Australian Science and Mathematics School (ASMS).

Finally, to keep up-to-date, check the STEMxCON website and follow @stemxcon on Twitter.

[EDIT]

My session went really well, and I am so grateful for those who came along and got involved in the back-channel chat. The full recording of the session is available here, using Blackboard Collaborate (MP3 Audio and MP4 Video also available).
Two great outcomes for me were:

  1. The positive feedback really gave me the drive to further develop unit and ensure that I run it again next year.
  2. We had a discussion about including more literacy skills, and bringing in an English teacher. The unit provides a perfect platform for a persuasive writing piece. It could also be the springboard for a creative writing piece.

Tracy Watanabe followed up on Twitter with a couple of great Tweets, which really made my day. The second tweet includes links to some pretty amazing programs, in which the Police and Journalism students are involved in Forensic Science units. Love it.