The Plastic Brain

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Trial run for the Transit of Venus in June. Thought I’d better perfect the art of solar visualisation before the big day in front of my students. Turns out it wasn’t that hard – even got some sun spots in focus (the focus on the paper is better than my camera could manage). The SOHO image (orange) is added for reference.

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My proposed introduction to the topic of similar triangles…

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Treasure trove of old mathematics exams!

My old maths teacher has retired, and is passing on some of his old resources to me, including a set of old exam papers from as far back as 1965.

For the record, question 1 on the Mathematics II paper starts with:

“Find the derivative, with respect to x, of:

(a) x/e^x (b) arctan(1/x) (c) lnlnx”

Eek!

I’m hoping to use them as a source of test questions, but fear they may be too hard for the current generation.

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I’m about to start my second teaching placement.

Thinking of mixing it up a bit this time….

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I am training to be a high school Mathematics teacher. I have been following matthen for a while now, and I recommend any maths teachers (and anyone interested in maths) to do the same. Ideas like this are simple and so illuminating, and his many animations bring geometric concepts to life.

matthen:

I made this elastic frame of an octahedron to demonstrate two of its properties. Firstly it can be stretched so that its edges can be drawn without crossings, as shown in the animation (it is planar; this is true for all convex polyhedra). Secondly the edges can be drawn without lifting the pen, and without going back on an edge (it is Eulerian or unicursal). This means I was able to create the frame with one single piece of elastic and no cuts. This wouldn’t be possible for e.g. the cube, or any other Platonic solid.

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